When should paxlovid be prescribed?

Paxlovid is authorized for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatric patients (over 12 years of age who weigh at least 40 kilograms or about 88 pounds) who have positive direct viral tests for SARS-CoV-2, who are at high risk of progression to even severe COVID-19.People who are vaccinated or who have recovered from COVID could still benefit from the drug, says Dr. Priya Nori, an infectious disease doctor at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York, and professor at Albert Einstein School of Medicine.

When should paxlovid be prescribed?

Paxlovid is authorized for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatric patients (over 12 years of age who weigh at least 40 kilograms or about 88 pounds) who have positive direct viral tests for SARS-CoV-2, who are at high risk of progression to even severe COVID-19.People who are vaccinated or who have recovered from COVID could still benefit from the drug, says Dr. Priya Nori, an infectious disease doctor at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York, and professor at Albert Einstein School of Medicine. Taking Paxlovid could help you recover faster, feel better faster, and potentially be less infectious faster, Nori says. Cohen said that he and his colleagues at his office prescribe as soon as possible to patients who think they need Paxlovid.

Ultimately, the confusion surrounding Paxlovid, a pill that was largely tested during the Delta wave, is part of a larger debate about how best to treat patients as the virus evolves. 54-year-old Dan Weissmann tried three different routes to access Paxlovid in the Chicago area when he contracted the COVID in April. However, if you're vaccinated and boosted, you're young and healthy, you probably don't need Paxlovid and the virus will go away on its own. However, broader eligibility makes it difficult for some doctors to decide who should or should not receive Paxlovid.

Debra Poutsiaka, acting head of the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases at Tufts Medical Center, recommends Paxlovid to all eligible patients. Cohen and other doctors also have to deal with the Paxlovid rebound, which occurred in one or two percent of patients in the initial clinical trial that resulted in FDA approval of Paxlovid. Another way to get to Paxlovid is to visit one of the 2,300 health centers, urgent care clinics and pharmacies designated by the government as testing sites for treatment. The disease can manifest itself in many different ways in different patients, and Paxlovid, like any medication, has possible side effects.

The most common side effects of Paxlovid are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and altered sense of taste. Paxlovid, a combination of two antiviral medications called nirmatrelvir and ritonavir, cannot be taken at the same time as some common supplements and medications, such as statins and some birth control pills. While there are some medications on the market that can treat COVID-19, the most effective treatment is Paxlovid, an antiviral developed by Pfizer that is 89% successful in reducing serious illnesses. The side effects of Paxlovid can sometimes outweigh the benefits of taking the medication, which is another reason why this medication is prescribed only to people at high risk, says Dr.

Kenney who states that Paxlovid is currently the best treatment for COVID-19 because of its effectiveness and ease of use. During the winter omicron surge, pill supplies were limited and many healthcare providers prescribed Paxlovid only to the most vulnerable people, due to old age or serious underlying illnesses. The group of people who can prescribe Paxlovid is now even broader. On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration began allowing pharmacists to prescribe the drug, which was shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization and death by 89% in an initial study of unvaccinated patients.

Karl Hauze
Karl Hauze

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