Can covid-19 vaccines cause heart problems?

What you need to know about myocarditis, a rare side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine in young people. Michelle Johnson, a cardiologist, says that heart problems caused by the COVID-19 vaccine are extremely rare.

Can covid-19 vaccines cause heart problems?

What you need to know about myocarditis, a rare side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine in young people. Michelle Johnson, a cardiologist, says that heart problems caused by the COVID-19 vaccine are extremely rare. If they do occur, they usually go away on their own or require medication. Heart inflammation, or myocarditis, has been reported to be a very rare side effect of COVID-19 vaccines.

Some people reported having a faster heartbeat in the days after the Covid-19 vaccine. This may be part of the body's normal immune response to the vaccine and is generally not a cause for concern. Research has shown that having previously had a coronavirus infection is much more likely than the Covid-19 vaccine to cause heart problems, although these cardiac arrests may not be related to coronavirus infection either. Herd immunity helps protect people who can't get vaccinated, such as newborns or people who are allergic to the vaccine.

According to the CDC, pregnant or recently pregnant women are at high risk of death or serious illness from COVID-19, including illnesses that require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator or other special breathing equipment. Herd immunity refers to the point at which enough people in society have protective antibodies against a disease, either because they have been vaccinated or infected before, making it difficult for the disease to be transmitted from one person to another. In the United Kingdom, no figures have been published on cardiac arrests in children under 18 years of age after vaccination, meaning that there has been a small number, too small to publish, or none at all. In the United Kingdom, cases of myocarditis following administration of the vaccine have been highest in the 18 to 29 age group, followed by the 30 to 39 age group.

For this reason, the American Heart Association has published a statement urging all people with cardiovascular risk factors to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccine-related symptoms of myocarditis usually appear three to five days, and usually not more than a week, after receiving the vaccine. He found that cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and diabetes were associated with an increased risk of serious illness or death from COVID-19 in all age groups. Although some cases of myocarditis have been linked to the vaccine, in these cases the disease has generally been mild and those affected, for the most part, have felt better quickly, after treatments and rest.

Overall, the rates of myocarditis and pericarditis following vaccination against Covid were not significantly different from those of other vaccines, including influenza, although rates of myocarditis or pericarditis in young men were higher with mRNA-based Covid vaccines, such as Moderna or Pfizer. Your health care team can advise you on whether it's best to get the second vaccine as soon as you're eligible (especially for people age 65 and older) or wait a full eight weeks to get the second vaccine. During a public health emergency, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA may allow the use of medical products, such as new vaccines, that have not yet received full agency approval if they are needed to combat serious or life-threatening illnesses and there are no acceptable alternatives available. Vaccination usually temporarily increases levels of inflammation as the body generates a response to the vaccine.

Karl Hauze
Karl Hauze

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